In Sports

Doing the wave: Lame or part of the game?

Guide to doing the wave at Miller Park (aka Camp Randall East)

Okay, first off -- doing the wave is so 1992.

But, like many trends, it never fully lost its popularity in Wisconsin, and Badgers fans especially know that unique "twists" on the wave can keep it fresh and fun while earning the attention of opposing players and fans. This was also pulled off with impressive skill during the Cleveland/L.A. Angels series at Miller Park.

Frankly, the wave bugs us.

We saw attempts at a Camp Randall-style twist on the traditional wave during a recent Brewers game against Pittsburgh. You could tell some fans were in the know and others not when it came to the special wave combination unique to Wisconsin. It was at this point that we spotted an opportunity to use the power of OnMilwaukee.com to help our fair city "do a better wave."

So, without further adieu, here's how Brewers fans can turn Miller Park into "Camp Randall East" and still pull off the wave while making it cool.

1. Regular Wave -- The fans do a standard wave around the ballpark, the way they do it everywhere else. Boring and old hat, yes, but it's the bread and butter way to get it going. May require several attempts to get it started properly. Watch the Dew Deck or left field bleachers for the most probable "start" area. As a fan, you can choose to not participate. Wait for something more creative.

2. Slow Wave -- After a successful regular wave, the next lap begins with a very slow-motion rendition of the original wave. You can spot it easily: arms that very slowly rise and fall, and suddenly the entire process takes several seconds per section. This is the first variation that's unique, and believe us, opposing players and fans take notice.

3. Fast Wave -- After the "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida"-like pace of the Slow Wave, when it cycles back to the section of origin, the wave then picks up the pace to ridiculous fever; as in, it takes less than about 45 seconds to go all the way around the stadium. You leap out of your seat to participate in it and somehow, like a true Milwaukeean, manage to not spill a drop.

4. Reverse Wave -- While the Fast Wave is whipping around, you may notice the originating section -- those in the know -- vigorously pointing in the opposite direction. That means, when the Fast Wave reaches that section, it reverses back in the same direction from whence it came. That wave, often a Fast Wave itself, heads in the opposite direction as the original and goes all the way around the stadium.

5. The Double-Reverse Wave -- As the originating section absorbs the Reverse Wave, each section on either side then starts their own, heading in opposite directions. They criss-cross on the opposite side of the field, but as long as everyone keeps their wits about them, it can criss-cross and still make it all the way back around, two waves in opposite directions.

After that, well, spontaneity can kick in. But, hopefully by this point a great Brewers play will divert attention back to the field.

Now go make us proud! And remember, no wave while the Brewers are at bat or while the game is close. Respect the sport first, fulfill your wave fancies second.


Talkbacks

ChateauDweller | June 15, 2007 at 9:34 a.m. (report)

Natemarq-- You are clearly suffering from alma mater jealousy. I know its rough going to MU and having to suffer watching a real athletic program on regional TV. I think that if you are going to call people stupid/ignorant, you sould first proofread your posts. GPA

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OlderWiser | June 15, 2007 at 8:19 a.m. (report)

Waving is annoying....yet another reason to impede our view of the game. Some of us actually enjoy the baseball action on the field, despite rude fans who insist on standing to cheer for absolutely everything or persistent vendors making sales right in our line of vision.... Last but not least....Miller Park is NOT Camp Randall...east or anywhere. Two completely different atmospheres.

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Natemarq | June 14, 2007 at 4:31 p.m. (report)

I hate to break it to you Wisconson Fans, but contrary to the lore that is discussed around Van Gundersons Pub in Astowonogomwocville Wisconsin the Badger fans did not invent the wave. Sorry to break it you guys but they didnt. Sadly Wisconsin fans are the least informed sports fans as they believe that the Big Ten Still has the best football and Basketball, and of course they still believe the SEC is an overated sports confrence. To clarify, the Wave was invented in Oakland California by an A's fan in the 70's. "Yah mean it wasnt my brother Marc Pacckynzki at the Badger game in 1992" No it was not. In fact college football was around a long time before 1992. Sorry Just had to rant about the ignorance of Wisconsin Sports fans. Please dont turn Miller Park into Camp Randall east, or any other stadium than what it was.

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Dusty_Bottoms | June 14, 2007 at 3:47 p.m. (report)

I disagree that the wave is fun, and that it is "so 1992." Maybe 1982. I think it's pretty stupid, but then again, I'm old and crabby. That said, I will grudgingly tolerate it unless any of the following conditions exist: 1) The stands are 2/3 empty. 2) I'm trying to watch the game (which unless it's a major blowout, I am). 3) The idiots trying to start the wave when either, both, or neither of the prior conditions exist don't realize it's not working and sit their drunk a$$es down and give it up. Now you kids get the hell off my lawn.

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Jon D. | June 14, 2007 at 1:40 p.m. (report)

The best wave done was at County Stadium on "umbrella night" with people opening and closing 35,000 umbrellas in wave like unison.

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