In Sports

"I'm the same guy, on and off. I think any fan that knows my work who comes up and says "hello" will see the same guy when he turns on the TV set," says Coshun. (PHOTO: Allen Fredrickson)

In Sports

On Davey Nelson: "I say, look at what you can bring to the telecast that I can't bring. Tell me something about the game that only you can tell." (PHOTO: Allen Fredrickson)

Milwaukee Talks: FSN Wisconsin reporter Craig Coshun



Audio Podcast: Craig Coshun talks about how easy it is to stay energized during a long season
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OMC: Is it more fun to be a broadcaster when the teams are winning?

CC: No doubt. But I thought, early on, when we went through struggles, always losing on the road and getting swept, it's still really enjoyable to come to the games and tell the stories of 25 guys.

OMC: Working with Davey Nelson has to provide some unique challenges. Everyone tells me that Davey is the nicest guy in the world, but he's new to this side of the business. You, however, have been a broadcaster for a long time. How do you get the best from him, without appearing condescending or forced?

CC: I've worked with a lot of people who have played or coached and then got into broadcasting. The biggest key that I tell these guys is that you have to just talk the game. You have to talk the same way that you would to a player if you're a coach. If you've done post-game interviews, you're not speaking to the camera any differently, you're just trying to add a little personality to it. I say, look at what you can bring to the telecast that I can't bring. Tell me something about the game that only you can tell. Davey and I get along and spend time off camera, and that helps.

OMC: Is the version we see of you on television the same as when you're not at work?

CC: I'm the same guy, on and off. I think any fan that knows my work who comes up and says "Hello" will see the same guy when he turns on the TV set, without question. People say, "I don't want to take up too much of your time, you probably don't want to talk sports." That's all I want to do.

OMC: FSN is more of a partner with the Brewers than an unbiased media source. But you come from a journalism background, so is it hard to report mostly only the positive stories?

CC: I don't think that we're completely homers, and there are some broadcasters who are. Obviously, we know that we're a team partner, and the first thing we do is look for positive stories. We don't need to search this year. When Rickie Weeks fails to turn a double play, what we're not going to do is beat it to death. When you're around every day, you do have a pretty good perspective. Was it the two walks in the ninth that killed them, or was it the double play? You have to look at who's the target and who's not.

OMC: Plus, you can't be burning sources when you need these guys' interviews for a whole season, right?

CC: We travel with them. There have been enough circumstances over the year when managers get fired halfway through the season, trades are made, guys are sent down surprisingly, someone gets injured or in trouble ... you've got to report it on that broadcast like a reporter reports it. You pick your spot, get it out there, and then you move on. If there needs to be subtle reminders throughout the game, you do that. I enjoy making sure people are informed. I love telling stores, but we need to make sure people are informed.

OMC: You're one of a handful of people in Milwaukee who have been seen in high definition. Do you prepare differently for the HD games?

CC: That's scary. I wasn't even aware of that. I have a giant forehead, and fortunately my face is more vertical so it isn't spread out as much. Eventually the HD supervisors will roll in and realize that there's a lot of work to be done. But I try not to think about the close-up shots.

OMC: You've spent your whole career in Wisconsin, and your wife, who was in Madison television, isn't anymore. Do you have network aspirations?

CC: My wife is kind of retired from the business, with the kids still being young. You always have to have the door cracked open to anything, because guess what, someone could call and tell you they no longer need you.

My philosophy over the course of the last eight years covering the Bucks and the Brewers for this network is to work as hard as I possibly can. I've been told that's been noticed. You ride the wagon until the wheels fall off.

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