Charles malig

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Urban spelunking: James E. Groppi High School / 27th Street School

Published Aug. 27, 2019

Some Milwaukee Public Schools are like palimpsests in cream city brick, as architect after architect, school board after school board tinkered them, leaving tantalizing bits of the past peeking out from behind an endless parade of new contributions. A building that describes this process well is currently home to James E. Groppi High School, 1312 N. 27th St.

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Urban Spelunking: New Deal-era Enderis Playfield is a WPA gem

Published Sept. 20, 2018

In addition to the "green necklace" of Milwaukee County Parks draped so alluringly around the area, MPS owns 52 neighborhood playfields that add a dose of green space - and fun - to some Milwaukee neighborhoods. One of those is Enderis Playfield, a New Deal-era gem built by the WPA.

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Diving into the history of Milwaukee's natatoria

Published Jan. 16, 2018

Despite the fact that hundreds of thousands of Milwaukeeans once visited the city's seven natatoria annually for many years, these days the word seems to conjure only one thing for Cream City citizens: dining next to a dolphin pool.

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Urban Spelunking: Milwaukee's five Bungalow firehouses

Published Feb. 23, 2017

Charles Malig designed many MFD quarters - including some you surely recognize - but that his signature contribution to the genre makes a quieter statement is not an accident. Meet Milwaukee's five bungalow firehouses, all of which survive, nestled into their neighborhoods.

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Profiles in Milwaukee history: Architect & fireman Sebastian Brand

Published Nov. 22, 2016

There are countless Milwaukeeans who have left an indelible mark on the city, even though folks rarely utter their names. One of them is Sebastian Brand, a German immigrant firefighter and mason turned architect, who designed many firehouses. Meet him here.

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Urban Spelunking: Brady Street's Engine Co. 6

Published June 21, 2016

Recently, we visited Engine Co. 6 on Brady Street, a firehouse that, in addition to being well-known in the neighborhood, has a long history on the East Side. The first station was built here in 1875 and was replaced with the current building in 1946.

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Urban spelunking: Milwaukee Isolation Hospital/Southside Health Center

Published March 6, 2015

While today, Milwaukee Health Department's Southside Health Center, 1639 S. 23rd St., is a bright, cheery neighborhood clinic offering health advice, free immunizations and the like, this was once South View Hospital, built as an isolation facility for folks suffering from brutal contagious diseases.

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Urban Spelunking: Milwaukee Fire Dept.'s Engine Co. 1

Published Feb. 27, 2015

You'll be unsurprised to hear that visiting interesting Milwaukee buildings of all kinds leads to meeting all kinds of similarly interesting Milwaukeeans. But, when I visited Milwaukee Fire Dept.'s Engine 01, 784 N. Broadway, recently, the folks I met there were at least as interesting than the building itself.

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An architectural Ringer?

Published March 28, 2014

Yesterday, I stumbled upon a 1926 article about the earliest architects working in Milwaukee. One sentence particularly caught my attention.

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Burning passion fuels Fire Education Center and Museum mission

Published Jan. 17, 2014

Inside one of the five bungalow style firehouses built in the 1920s by Milwaukee architect Charles Malig, there is a quiet treasure. The Milwaukee Fire Education Center and Museum, 1615 W. Oklahoma Ave., isn't exactly a secret, but considering the passion for the history of firefighting that burns in the folks that maintain and grow it, it almost feels like it.

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T.M.E.R.&L. left behind more than hidden tracks

Published Aug. 13, 2013

Every now and then, as a roadway decays, we're reminded that there are miles and miles of remnants of The Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company - in the form of tracks - just below the surface in the city. But the company also left behind some more visible reminders of its existence, too.