Michael McDonald performed on June 28 at the Uline Warehouse stage at Summerfest.
Michael McDonald performed on June 28 at the Uline Warehouse stage at Summerfest. (Photo: David Bernacchi)
Despite being seated behind a keyboard, Michael McDonald knows how to entertain.
Despite being seated behind a keyboard, Michael McDonald knows how to entertain. (Photo: David Bernacchi)
Michael McDonald played many of his hits as a Doobie Brother and solo artist, as well as many covers.
Michael McDonald played many of his hits as a Doobie Brother and solo artist, as well as many covers. (Photo: David Bernacchi)

McDonald mixes it up, shines at the Big Gig

Michael McDonald is into his 60s, and has been performing since 1970, so while he didn't go all-out through a full 90-minute set on Saturday night at Summerfest, he sounded crisp and provided his patented mix of pop and soul with gusto and even mixed in some different covers at the Uline Warehouse stage.

He took the stage promptly at 10 p.m., and he exited following a spirited encore at 11:23 – and in between he took some vocal breaks to feature his band and accompanying vocalist Drea Rhenee, while also talking to the crowd.

The former Doobie Brothers front man began his set with two of the group’s tracks, "Here To Love You" and "It Keeps You Runnin’" which led right into "Sweet Freedom," his 1986 single off the "Running Scared" movie soundtrack.

He paused after these three songs to introduce his band, which included Bernie Chiaravalle on guitar, Dan Needham on drums, Tommy Sims on base, Pat Coli on keyboard and Mark Douthit on saxophone and keyboard.

McDonald is known to pay his group compliments and allow them to shine individually with solos, but he also took the time to thank his stage crew before making a joke heading into his next song: "As I get older, it came to mean something totally different – this song is ‘I Keep Forgettin.’"

It was well rehearsed, but the crowd laughed and roared with approval as he played his 1982 hit, which was originally recorded by Curtis Jackson 20 years prior.

After "You Belong To Me" he transitioned into covers.

This is where he seemed to hit his stride, beginning with "I Heard It Through The Grapevine." Prior to that, I wasn’t sure if his mic was a bit low, or if it couldn’t quite catch all of his notes as he bounced behind his keyboard.

But, perhaps he was gearing up for a song he clearly loved to sing – as he introduced it as "one of the prettier songs to ever come out of Nashville" – Ray Charles’ ballad "You Don’t Know Me."

This song was all McDonald, with Douthit assistant on the sax. He was …

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Reaction to the Bucks' drafting of Jabari Parker poured in from all over the country.
Reaction to the Bucks' drafting of Jabari Parker poured in from all over the country. (Photo: Duke University Photography)

Reaction to Bucks selection of Jabari Parker

The Milwaukee Bucks drafted Duke star Jabari Parker No. 2 overall, and reaction from media, players and fans from not only the Cream City, but around the country, poured in via Twitter.

Here are the highlights from media, athletes and coaches from around the country:


And of course, the city of Milwaukee and Bucks fans were equally excited:

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The par 3, ninth hole at Erin Hills provides great drama for even the average player.
The par 3, ninth hole at Erin Hills provides great drama for even the average player.
The view from new clubhouse steps atop Erin Hills. Such vistas create drama around the course.
The view from new clubhouse steps atop Erin Hills. Such vistas create drama around the course.

Erin Hills is great golf theater

HARTFORD – Standing on the 18th tee box at Erin Hills, you face east, and the Basilica of Holy Hill rises above the old clubhouse. It’s a truly "made for TV" view, especially when you consider that our national championship will be wrapped up on that hole in mid-June of 2017.

Much of the promise of Erin Hills as a U.S. Open venue has been not just about the golf course, but the number of spectators it can hold, the potential for 360-degree viewing areas between multiple green complexes, and scenery on its nearly 300 acres of glacier-cut topography.

While Erin Hills may be made for high-definition with the rippling fescue, it’s a grand stage for the "regular" player, too.

You don’t get "lost" in the view, necessarily, even though you will want to take pictures all day long.

It’s just that it feels big and important (just look at this view from the tee down toward the redesigned green.

It is one of this country’s great golf stages that the public can access, and if you play the right tees it allows you feel like you belong on it, too.

Travis Diener, shown here during his Marquette Hall of Fame induction, has returned to the program as part of the men's basketball staff. (Photo: Maggie Casey)
Travis Diener, shown here during his Marquette Hall of Fame induction, has returned to the program as part of the men's basketball staff. (Photo: Maggie Casey)
Travis Diener was part of the last Final Four team for Marquette in 2003. (Photo: Marquette Athletics)
Travis Diener was part of the last Final Four team for Marquette in 2003. (Photo: Marquette Athletics)

Diener returns to Marquette as member of coaching staff

Steve Wojciechowski is becoming a source of breaking news for Marquette University basketball fans, as the first-year head coach followed up a June 10 tweet about how well Marquette alumni have represented the program with a message on June 11 that welcomed back one of the university's favorite sons, Travis Diener, back to the program as director of player personnel.

 The university announced the move with a statement shortly thereafter on Wednesday in which Diener said he is "excited to be coming back where it all began for me. I am extremely humbled that Coach Wojciechowski thinks highly enough of me to give me this opportunity as I start the next chapter in my life and more importantly come back to the place that means so much to me and my family."

Diener played from 2001–2005 and was a central figure in the Golden Eagles' Final Four run in 2003. He is the sixth leading scorer in Marquette history with 1,691 points, ranks second in 3-pointers made (284) and third in assists (617).

Drafted into the NBA in 2005, he played three seasons before continuing his career overseas. He retired earlier this week from Dinamo Sassari in Italy.

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