In Milwaukee History

This cool vintage sign, long a sight on the Northwest Side urban landscape, is for sale. (PHOTO: Adam Levin)

Own a piece of history: The stellar General Lumber sign is for sale

Northwesterners likely remember the eye-catchingly stellar General Lumber sign that stood atop the building at the lumber yard of the same name at 6001 N. 91st St. for 50 years.

The building dates to 1952 and the sign to 1960.

In fact, the sign has been there yet another decade since the store closed in 2010, too. Now, the owner of the property – which serves as a school bus parking lot – and the sign is looking to sell it and find it a new home.

To that end, he's working with Adam Levin, author of "Fading Ads of Milwaukee" book and moderator of a number of popular Facebook groups to sell the distinctive sign. Levin has also helped find homes for other signs, including one that long hung outside Goldmann's on Mitchell Street.

Nate Plotkin, who runs the WhyMKE Instagram account is also helping spread the word.

The star-shaped sign is maroon and yellow with a quintet of smaller stars – in green, orange, blue, yellow and red – orbiting the main one.

Here's a video of the sign:

"(We) are working to ensure that this piece of history does not end up in a scrap yard, and melted for parts like many signs before it," Plotkin wrote in an email. "If you have any properties that you think could be interested in purchasing the sign, please let me know and I will get you in contact."

If you're interested in purchasing the sign, email me and I'll connect you.

The owner, who wishes to remain anonymous, says Levin, who adds, "he would prefer to sell it to someone local, doesn't matter to him how they display it.

"He did't share a set price, so he's open to offers."

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